Mulattoes in the Postbellum South and Beyond

Mulattoes in the Postbellum South and Beyond
Carlton Dubois McClain’s ancestral pedigree is put into perspective within the context of the historical circumstances relevant to those various unions that occurred between Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans in his lineage.
About the Book

Implementing the knowledge that he came to acquire through his studies, Carlton Dubois McClain builds a historical framework as to the predispositions pitted against historically mixed-race persons and people of color, and he goes on to elaborate on the roots of the socio-economic status of contemporary Americans of black African descent, and how the historically Eurocentric-based power and prejudice of some came to adversely impact both the legacy and current-day condition of an entire community of people. In using his own ancestral family as both a case in point and a solidifier of his argument, Carlton Dubois McClain chronicles, examines, and analyzes the historical place that his mulatto-identified ancestors held in society, and, in the process, he constructs a historically-based premise as to the plight, condition, and legacy of historically mixed-race people in the Postbellum South (or the Southern United States after the American Civil War). In so doing, it is his aspiration that this book brings light to the occurrences pertinent to the historical multi-ethnicity within the United States of America.